Menu
featured / food, glorious food

Lunar New Year Eats, Sweets, and Traditions

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
paper lantern

The Lunar New Year is one of the most vibrant holidays celebrated around the world. While the way it’s celebrated differs depending on who you are and where you are, the sentiments remain the same. Families reunite and celebrate with lively parties, family gatherings, or by going out to dinner. Lights, red decorations, and plates piled high with delicious food ring in the new year, red envelopes are stuffed with money and exchanged, and citrus fruits like mandarin oranges and tangerines bring luck and prosperity.

tangerine

“For me, Lunar New Year conjures memories of fierce joy and being together with family. Big feasts, loud, crowded tables, and lucky superstitions. The New Year arrives with a roar. It’s a riot of color, especially reds and golds. It makes me feel connected to a heritage that’s thousands of years old and provides a truly fresh start and clean slate every year – more so for me than the January 1st New Year.”  

– Michelle Chan, Imperfect Foods Grocery Merchandiser

This year (the year of the ox), the holiday begins on February 12 and continues for 15 days through the lunar cycle. And while going out to eat or getting together with friends and family for a meal may not be on the table, cooking something delicious at home certainly is. 

longevity noodles

Longevity Noodles

Noodles art

Longevity noodles are one of the most popular dishes enjoyed during the Lunar New Year. Traditionally, the dish was prepared as a single verrry long noodle in broth or sauce to symbolize a long life and bring you luck in the coming year. But nowadays, they’re typically just rather long ramen or rice noodles. With pan-fried shiitake mushrooms and green onions, this dish is best eaten fresh. Although we doubt you’ll have an issue with leftovers. 

Dumplings – Pork and Veggie Potstickers

pork and veggie potstickers
mushrooms

During the Lunar New Year, dumplings represent prosperity— as they look like ancient gold and silver money pieces. The different fillings, like cabbage and radish, can be good for luck, your mood, or even a healthy complexion. Dumplings are typically considered to be just about anything that’s a bite-sized dough pocket stuffed with a delicious filling. Potstickers, wontons, and gyoza are the most common. They often take different shapes, are made in specific wrappers, and have unique preparations. What makes these pork and veggie potstickers “potstickers” is that they’re fried in a shallow pan to create a delicious, crispy, and caramelized bottom while the top and inside remains soft and perfectly cooked. 

paper lantern

Almond Cookies

Chinese Almond Cookies are a simple crisp and buttery cookie full of rich almond flavor. They’re a popular treat to make or buy during the Lunar New Year as they symbolize coins and are thought to bring good fortune. Also, they’re delicious, so what’s not to like? 

Happy Lunar New Year! We hope these recipes light up your dinner table.

6 Comments

  • Avatar
    Brenda Garcia
    February 3, 2021 at 9:28 pm

    Hi,

    How do we cancel a subscription? Thanks in advance.

    Brenda

    Reply
    • Imperfect
      Imperfect
      February 5, 2021 at 7:41 pm

      We’re sorry to hear that you’d like to cancel. See how to here [bit.ly/2mpJyyq]. Or feel free to contact our customer care team who can help you here: bit.ly/385DIoA 💚

      Reply
  • Avatar
    cecilia suzette polley
    February 4, 2021 at 9:37 pm

    Great way to shop and save. Except the avocados were black and mushy not able to use. The broccoli was limp as wet noodles.

    Reply
    • Imperfect
      Imperfect
      February 5, 2021 at 7:48 pm

      We’re really sorry to hear about this and we definitely never want you paying for anything that you aren’t able to enjoy. Could you please send our customer care team a note here: bit.ly/385DIoA 💚

      Reply
  • Avatar
    Virginia M. Mclaughlin
    February 10, 2021 at 7:27 am

    Dear Michelle,

    My partner and I eat Asian at least three times a week or more. He’s a China guy and has nineteen children (now grown and in wonderful careers), and I was blessed with being a learner with a group of Korean monks forty years ago. Heaven will be bowls full of hot spicy kimchee and buckwheat noodles piled high with veggies and the all time favorite: potstickers lightly fried on the bottom with bone broth for tenderness. Ohhhhh and beef basil chow fun. Prosperous year of the ox.
    Virginia

    Reply
    • Imperfect
      Imperfect
      February 16, 2021 at 8:26 pm

      Happy Year of the Ox! 💚

      Reply

Leave a Reply